Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Back in the day...




Victorian women had the most unusually intricate crafts for their day and many were kept in shadow boxes and domes to preserve their beauty and serve as a reminder of loved ones and events past. My friend Cathy from This Girls Art has a collection of hair wreathes. Many people are turned off by these unusual pieces of art, but they are such fantastic works, how can you look at them as unfit. Check out her blog and her earlier posts, you will see beauty beyond compare. I'm sure there will be people that don't see the beauty in them, you'll hear 'ooo, gross' but they are looking at art with only one eye opened and a narrow mind closed. To see the beauty and caring that went into each piece is to see with both eyes, whether you like it or not...now you don't want me to get into taxidermy do you...remember, I am actually asking you to have both eyes open, to see the art. Cathy is one of those artists that is never afraid to make a leap into her art, not really caring what other people may think of it, it is a passion... she is also an artist that would never turn up her nose at another persons work. As soon as the flooded highway opens up, I'm going to her house for a photo shoot, so you can see some of her work and her wonderful little yellow Granny's house and fabulous gardens. Do check out her past posts, she is a wonderful person/artist and a dear friend and like most artists, full of passion.


I have two similar wreathes in my home, one is made from many colors of yarn and the other is a multitude of feathers. For any creative person to sit for days weaving and gluing to create such masterpieces is worthy of praise, no matter what your opinion may be. I once had a shadow box that was huge, 3x3 1/2ft., it was a wreath made entirely of seeds, seeds of all varieties and color, a beauty to behold.


Manley's Antiques has a beautiful shadow box with a brides vale, a memento of a joyous time in one young girls life. You will also see hair wreathes with the photo of a deceased person, in their casket...but again you have to look at it as you would a mummy of antiquity, not with disdain, but with caring , as this was once a person loved by many and great care went to preserve their memory...for all of us collectors to gaze upon once again. For me, I'm glad these works of art are again treasured, they do have their place in history.

4 comments:

Roses and Lilacs said...

As late as the 1940's people still carried small locks of hair in pendants. It was a token that gave them comfort when the loved one was absent for whatever reason. I think it began before photos were common. It was something you could see and touch.

In my baby book, Mom placed a lock of my hair from my first haircut. All tied up in a pink ribbon.

Jen said...

Sigh....Love the Shadow Box with the old photo of the Bride & Groom...:)

High Desert Diva said...

Well said

cconz said...

i,m glad hair art creeps people out. that means more for me!!! It's a form of folk art. Art created by everyday people. like bottle cap art, pine cone picture frames, matchstick sulptures, spool furniture. i could go on. Those victorians were Soo clever.